Home‎ > ‎Administrative_Guidelines‎ > ‎2000_Program‎ > ‎

2464 AdmGuide_Programs for Academically Gifted-Talented Students

INTRODUCTION AND OVERVIEW
 
Definition
 
Wisconsin State Statutes define gifted and talented students as, "Pupils enrolled in public schools who give
evidence of high performance capability in intellectual, creative, artistic, leadership, or specific academic areas and
who need services or activities not ordinarily provided in a regular school program in order to fully develop such
capabilities" (from s.118.35(1), Wis. Stats.).
 
Philosophy
 
The Wauwatosa School District believes that all students have unique gifts and talents, the ability to learn and
achieve, and opportunities for optimal development. We believe that gifted and talented students possess
measurable, qualitatively different characteristics in one or more of five areas: general intellectual ability, specific
academic ability, creativity, leadership, and artistic ability. The frequency, intensity, quality and/or novelty of their
response differ(s) from 97% of the population.
 
Beliefs
 
    A. Identification of giftedness should be early, ongoing and continuous.
 
    B. Appropriate programming for gifted and talented students is a responsibility shared by classroom teachers,
        specialists, support staff, administrators, parents and students.
 
    C. A program for gifted students must consistently provide challenge to develop students’ potential.
 
    D. Gifted and talented students learn in an environment where their gifts and abilities are valued and nurtured.
 
    E. Gifted and talented children have unique and varied cognitive and affective abilities and needs which may
        require unconventional and non-traditional approaches and/or scheduling.
 
    F. Gifted and talented students may require a differentiated curriculum and/or a variety of program options within
        and outside the classroom to meet their unique intellectual, social, and emotional needs.
 
    G. Communication between the parent and school staff regarding the gifted child’s learning needs is essential.
 
    H. Parents and teachers of gifted children may benefit from additional education and support.
 
Purpose of Gifted and Talented Identification
 
The purpose of identification is to make those persons responsible for a student’s programming aware of the
student’s capabilities so that the best match can be made of capabilities to programming. Identification is an
ongoing and continuous process to develop awareness of student capabilities and needs. All students are
considered for identification in kindergarten through 12th grade.
 
How Students Are Identified
 
The Wauwatosa School District uses multiple criteria, in accordance with the Wisconsin Department of Public
Instruction, to identify highly capable students in five areas. Multiple criteria used for identification of gifted and
talented students may include standardized test scores, individualized testing, parent/guardian nominations,
teacher nominations, and district assessments. All areas of identification must meet multiple criteria within the
area.
 
Areas of Identification
 
The five areas of identification are:
 
    A. General Intellectual Ability (GIA) (high level of overall intelligence)
 
    B. Specific Academic Ability (SAA) (excels in one or more academic subjects)
 
    C. Creativity (has original, varied, and/or unusual ideas and solutions)
 
    D. Leadership (demonstrates an unusual ability to relate to and motivate other people's ability to take charge)
 
    E. Artistic (Visual/Performing Arts) (intuitive sense of artistic, musical, or performing arts concepts)
 
For specific information of each area of identification, see the Gifted & Talented Resource section for 
Characteristics of Gifted Learners by Area of Identification (page 20) and Descriptions of Gifted and Talented
Identification Areas (page 21).
 
GIFTED AND TALENTED IDENTIFICATION PROCESS
 
Overview
 
Students identified for Gifted and Talented services are selected because they have learning needs that are
different than approximately 97% of the general population. Therefore, the goal of the identification process is to
apply comprehensive and unbiased procedures to find students who possess superior abilities and/or potential in
one or more of the areas of identification. When selecting students for identification, specific criteria appropriate to
each category of giftedness are used.
 
Initial referrals for Gifted and Talented Programming usually come from the classroom teacher who has in-depth
knowledge and understanding of a student’s abilities. Principals, other educational staff, or parents may also
initiate further assessments of students based on pre-screeners:
 
    A. State assessments such as the WKCE-CRT
 
    B. District assessments such as the NWEA MAP assessments
 
    C. Performance data such as portfolios
 
Identification Tools
 
We look at measures of performance, aptitude, and achievement. When gathering information to inform decisions
about students’ need for challenge beyond the regular curriculum, we consider standardized tests (objective, norm-referenced tests of academic or intellectual skill), performance data, certain selected grade-level classroom
assessments, and nomination forms (rating scales and narrative information from teachers and parents).
 
The Wauwatosa School District administers a number of assessments across grade levels to monitor program
outcomes as well as individual student performance and growth (see Assessment Data Chart pg. 6).
 
While no test is infallible, cognitive measures are widely accepted as a strong predictor of a child’s academic
ability. Combined with other test scores, day to day performance, and anecdotal information from teachers and
parents, this broad range of information can provide specific insight into a child’s academic and intellectual needs.
 
In addition to a standardized testing data profile for each student, information is gathered from classroom 
assessments and anecdotal information is gathered from parents, guardians, and teachers. One way of gathering
anecdotal information from parents and teachers is through the Gifted and Talented nomination form. Gifted and
Talented nomination forms can be completed and submitted by parents and teachers for any student at any time
to the District Teacher Leader or school counselor.
 
Data Analysis and Interpretation
 
Test data are analyzed each year to screen for possible General Intellectual Ability (GIA) and Specific Academic
Ability (SAA) G/T needs. If a student has obtained a qualifying score on a test such as the WKCE-CRT or MAP,
additional assessment may be warranted. A cognitive abilities test may be administered by the District Teacher
Leader, school counselor, or school psychologist.
 
Three types of data are used in the process of determining a student eligible for gifted services: assessment data,
supporting data, and performance data.
 
Assessment Data: Our students are assessed using the following instruments. Results can be used specifically
to gather information regarding ability and achievement on an individual basis. Assessments that are used for both
screening and determination include the following assessments.
 
Assessment                                             Contact                Area/s                        Purpose of
Screeners                                Grade      Person                Assessed                    Assessment
 
Wisconsin Knowledge                4, 8, 10    School Principal    Achievement of state    Measures student progress
and Concepts Examination                        or Counselor         standards in reading     toward state standards in all
(WKCE-CRT)                                                                       language, reading,        academic areas
                                                                                          science, social studies
                                                                                          and writing
 
Wisconsin Knowledge                3, 5, 6, 7  School Principal    Achievement of state    Measures student progress
and Concepts Examination                        or Counselor         standards in reading      toward state standards in
(WKCE-CRT)                                                                       and math                      math and reading

Measures of Academic               K-10        School Principal    Math, reading and        Measures student progress
Progress (MAP)                                        or Classroom        language arts               on formative ongoing basis
 
InView Test of Cognitive              2-5          District Teacher     Verbal and nonverbal     Measures student cognitive
Skills                                                                                                                     abilities that includes
                                                                                                                             verbal reasoning,
                                                                                                                             sequences, analogies and
                                                                                                                             quantitative reasoning
 
Wechsler Intelligence Scale        K-11        School                 Intelligence                   Measures student
for Children                                               Psychologist                                           intellectual ability

Woodcock-Johnson                    K-1          School                Achievement                 Measures student
                                                                Psychologist                                          academic achievement
 
Torrance Test of Creative             K-12        District Teacher    Creative thinking           Measures student creative
Thinking                                                    Leader                                                   thinking ability
 
NUMATS (Northwestern              3-8           District Teacher    EXPLORE, ACT &        Measures student
University Midwest Academic                      Leader                 SAT above grade          academic level and
Talent Search)                                                                      level testing in multiple  potential in multiple
                                                                                           content areas (requires  content areas
                                                                                           parent registration)
 
PSAT/SAT                                10-11        School Counselor   College admissions      Helps students plan
                                                                                             in reading and math     sequence as they prepare
                                                                                                                               for college (prerequisite
                                                                                                                               for National Merit
                                                                                                                               Scholarship Program)
 
EXPLORE                               8               School Counselor   College readiness          Measures student aca-
                                                                                            tests                            demic development and
                                                                                                                                explores career/training
                                                                                                                                options
 
PLAN (pre-ACT)                      10
 
ACT                                       10-11
 
Classroom Assessments         K-12            Classroom           Reading, math, writing,    Measures student
                                                                 teacher               social studies and           progress on formative
                                                                                           science                          ongoing basis
 
Supporting Data: Information provided by school staff, parents, peers, physicians, and others may contribute to the profile of the student. This may take the form of:
 
Supporting Data Chart
 
Assessment Screeners        Grade  Contact Person        Area/s Assessed            Purpose of Assessment
 
Gifted and Talented                K-12    District Teacher         Norm-referenced instru-    Used by teachers to
Evaluation Scales                             Leader (elementary)   ment that assesses         measure the characteristics
(G.A.T.E.S.)                                     or School Counselor   the characteristics,         of gifted and talented
                                                       (secondary)               skills and talents of         students
                                                                                       gifted students
 
IOWA Acceleration Scale       K-8      District Teacher         Test scores, school         Used by a team of         
                                                       Leader (elementary)   history, peer and adult     school professionals and
                                                       or School Counselor   relationships, attitudes    and parents when whole
                                                       (secondary)               towards learning and       grade acceleration 
                                                                                       other factors                   is considered              
 
Teacher and Parent               K-8      District Teacher          General Intellectual,        Used by parents and         
Nomination Forms and                      Leader (elementary)    Specific Academic          teachers to identify the
Checklists                                       or School Counselor    Area, Creativity,              characteristics of gifted  
                                                      (secondary)                 Artistic and Leadership   and talented students
 
Performance Data: A student’s strengths can be documented by using products or performances that are
gathered to create a portfolio in the artistic areas. School-related, community centered, and cocurricular activities
may be considered.
 
GIFTED AND TALENTED ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES
 
A. Role of the Administrator
 
    1. Serve as an advocate for gifted students
 
    2. Keep up-to-date on issues and trends in differentiation
 
    3. Provide teachers opportunities to learn about differentiation through staff development and other means
 
    4. Encourage and support teacher collaboration
 
    5. Obtain resources to assist teachers in planning differentiated lessons
 
    6. Facilitate communication among the staff, parents, and the community
 
B. Role of the Classroom Teacher
 
    1. Teachers (including special area teachers or resource teachers) complete the Teacher Gifted
        and Talented Student Nomination Form and Gifted and Talented Evaluation Scales (GATES) in order
        to help identify gifted learners. Indications that a child would benefit from gifted and talented identification may
        include:
 
        a. Student displays special area/s of superior performance or potential
 
        b. Student displays gifted characteristics
 
        c. Classroom differentiation does not meet the child’s academic, artistic, leadership, and/or creative needs
 
        d. Student was previously identified as GT in another school district
 
    2. Collaborate with the District Teacher Leader (D.T.L.) to create, implement, and review a Differentiated
        Educational Plan (D.E.P.) at the elementary level or Middle School Programming Model Checklist for
        identified students. Share this plan with parents at both parent/teacher conferences at elementary level
        and mail home at middle school level.
 
    3. Provide classroom differentiation and/or acceleration opportunities. Learning opportunities for gifted learners
        must consist of a continuum of differentiated curricular options, instructional approaches, and resource
        materials. Classroom teachers should:
 
        a. analyze the current curriculum standards and benchmarks in order to set appropriate expectations for
            identified students
 
        b. identify students preferred learning styles and interests
 
        c. differentiate curricula to provide learning experiences matched to students’ interests, readiness, and
            learning style
 
        d. plan and develop appropriate instructional methods, materials, and groupings
 
        e. assess ongoing progress and set/adjust learning goals for students
 
        f. communicate about differentiation practices with parents, teachers, and administrators
 
        g. teach/co-teach students in flexible groups
 
        h. plan/co-plan engaging tasks and products with students
 
        i. collaborate with the D.T.L. to identify resources needed to implement D.E.P.
 
    4. Keep records to ensure systematic and continuous programming.
 
C. Role of District Teacher Leader (D.T.L.) and School Counselor
 
    1. At the beginning of each school year, the D.T.L. or school counselor will:
 
        a. Provide classroom teachers and specialists with a list of identified students, area/s of identification, and
            level of identification (K-8)
 
        b. Meet with classroom teachers to create and/or update Differentiated Educational Plans (elementary) or
            Middle School Gifted and Talented Programming Model Checklists for identified students
 
        c. Send a letter and NUMATS brochure to the homes of SAA and GIA identified students in grades 3-8. To
            order brochures: Phone: 847-491-3782, extension 1 Website: http://www.ctd.northwestern.edu/numats/
 
    2. To identify GT students at the elementary level, the District Teacher Leader will:
 
        a. Screen recommended students from Teacher and Parent Gifted and Talented Student Nomination Forms
 
        b. Screen MAP test scores in fall and winter for students (grades 1-5) meeting the MAP Gifted and Talented
            Placement Guidelines
 
        c. Screen WKCE-CRT test scores in fall for students (grades 4-5) at the 97th+ percentile
 
        d. Administer appropriate assessment/s as needed (InView [grades 2-5], Torrance Test, and/or G.A.T.E.S.)
 
            Please Note: Once an InView test has been administered, a child should not take another InView test for
            12 months
 
        e. Arrange for the administration of Wechsler and/or Woodcock Johnson by school psychologist as needed
            and send home parent permission letter before administration of assessment
 
        f. Have the classroom teacher complete the G.A.T.E.S. and the parents complete the Parent Gifted and
           Talented Student Nomination Form if the child meets all but one of the identification criteria
 
        g. Complete the GT Student Data Sheet
 
    3. To identify GT students at the middle and high school level, the school counselor will:
 
        a. Screen recommended students from the Teacher and Parent Gifted and Talented Student Nomination
            Forms
 
        b. Administer appropriate assessment/s as needed (Torrance Test and/or G.A.T.E.S.)
 
        c. Arrange for the administration of Wechsler by school psychologist as needed and send home parent
            permission letter before administration of assessment
 
        d. Have teachers complete any relevant referral forms or survey scales (G.A.T.E.S.)
 
        e. Complete the GT Student Data Sheet
 
    4. If the child displays gifted characteristics, meets GT criteria, and/or instructional strategies are not meeting
        the child’s educational needs, a Student Assistance Team (S.A.T.) may be scheduled by the D.T.L.
       (elementary) or school counselor (secondary). The D.T.L. or school counselor will: schedule an S.A.T.
        and provide all members of the S.A.T. with copies of the Teacher and Parent Gifted and Talented Student
        Nomination Forms, the GT Student Data Sheet, the GT Identification Criteria, and any other relevant data.
 
    5. The S.A.T. reviews all pertinent information, refers to the GT Identification Criteria, and makes one of the
        following recommendations:
 
        a. The student does not meet the GT Criteria and requires no additional GT action at this time. The child may
            be referred to the S.A.T. in the future if needed.
 
        b. The student is "flagged" and continues to be monitored.
 
        c. The student meets the criteria and is identified as GT in a specific area/s based on the information
            presented at the S.A.T. (Please Note: The only exceptions that can be made in the criteria by an S.A.T.
            are for ELL students, twice exceptional students, and students from other cultures. Any other exception
            must be approved by the GT Coordinator and a representative from Student Learning.)
 
    6. Regardless of the outcome of the S.A.T., the D.T.L. or school counselor completes an S.A.T. Summary and
        parents are informed of the outcome of the S.A.T. (with accompanying letter).
 
    7. A student GT folder is created (hard copy or digital) and updated by the D.T.L. or school counselor for
        identified students. Assessment results, GT Data Sheet, Teacher or Parent Gifted and Talented Student
        Nomination Forms, S.A.T. Summary, parent communication, forms, surveys, etc. are placed in the folder.
 
    8. Once a student is identified, the D.T.L. (elementary) or school counselor (secondary) asks the building
        administrative assistant to identify the student as GT in PowerSchool.
 
    9. A Differentiated Educational Plan (elementary level) or Middle School Gifted and Talented Programming
        Model Checklist is created and reviewed annually by the D.T.L. and the classroom teacher/s. At the
        elementary level, this form is completed and shared with parents twice each school year during parent/
        teacher conferences and it is mailed home at the middle school level.
 
    10. The D.T.L. will meet with classroom educators periodically throughout the year to discuss the needs and
        services for identified students. The D.T.L. will collaborate with classroom teachers to develop and provide
        materials and resources and to implement a variety of differentiation opportunities.
 
    11. If a Level II or III student is considered for full grade level acceleration, the D.T.L. or school counselor will
        schedule a meeting to complete the IOWA Acceleration Scale. Ideally, the D.T.L., classroom teacher/s,
        parents, school psychologist, school counselor and principal should attend the meeting.
 
    12. Information on each identified GT student is entered into PowerSchool by the D.T.L., school counselor, or
        administrative assistant. These documents include:  the GT Student Data Sheet, GT Identification letter, and
        the results of any standardized testing completed by school personnel.
 
IDENTIFICATION CRITERIA
 
General Intellectual Ability (GIA) - *DRAFT
 
* Pilot Study 2009-2010
 
Level III
Acceptable CSI or IQ test score of 141 or higher, one criterion from assessment data, and a minimum of one other criterion:
 
Assessment Data
 
____ Qualifying score on Measures of Academic Progress (MAP) Gifted and Talented Placement Guidelines in
        reading and math
 
____ WKCE-CRT or other nationally normed standardized test at 99th percentile in reading and math
 
Supporting Data
 
____ 59-64 on the General Intellect section of the Parent/Guardian Inventory Checklist
 
____ A score of 125-130 on the intellectual subscale of the Gifted and Talented Evaluation Scales (GATES)
______________________________________________________
 
Level II
Acceptable CSI or IQ test score of 135 through 140 or higher, one criterion from assessment data, and a
minimum of one other criterion:
 
Assessment Data
 
____ Qualifying score on Measures of Academic Progress (MAP) Gifted and Talented Placement Guidelines in
        reading and math
 
____ WKCE-CRT or other nationally normed standardized test at 98th percentile in reading and math
 
Supporting Data
 
____ 53-58 on the General Intellect section of the Parent/Guardian Inventory Checklist
 
____ A score of 113-124 on the intellectual subscale of the Gifted and Talented Evaluation Scales (GATES)
______________________________________________________
 
Level I
Acceptable CSI or IQ test score of 130 through 134 or higher, one criterion from assessment data, and a
minimum of one other criterion:
 
Assessment Data
 
____ Qualifying score on Measures of Academic Progress (MAP) Gifted and Talented Placement Guidelines in
        reading and math
 
____ WKCE-CRT or other nationally normed standardized test at 97th percentile in reading and math
 
Supporting Data
 
____ 48-52 on the General Intellect section of the Parent/Guardian Inventory Checklist
 
____ A score of 108-112 on the intellectual subscale of the Gifted and Talented Evaluation Scales (GATES)
 
Specific Academic Ability (SAA) - *DRAFT Reading, Math, Science, and Social Studies
 
* Pilot Study 2009-2010
 
Level III
Acceptable InView Total Verbal/Nonverbal score or IQ score (see above), one criterion from assessment data, and a minimum of one other criterion:
 
Assessment Data
 
____ Qualifying score on Measures of Academic Progress (MAP) Gifted and Talented Placement Guidelines
        (reading or math)
 
____ WKCE-CRT (Scale Scores) at 99th percentile (reading, math, social studies, or science score)
 
____ Mathematics (Grades K-1): Broad Math Composite on the Woodcock-Johnson of 141+
 
____ Reading (Grades K-1): Instructional level at least four grade levels above the current grade level on the District
        Level II Reading Assessment or on the QRI (both narrative and expository)
 
____ Nationally normed standardized test scores at 99th national percentile
 
Supporting Data
 
____ 31-32 on the Specific Academic section of the Parent/Guardian Inventory Checklist
 
____ A score of 125-130 on the academic subscale of the Gifted and Talented Evaluation Scales (GATES)
 
_____________________________
 
Level II
Acceptable InView Total Verbal/Nonverbal score or IQ score (see above), one criterion from assessment data, and a minimum of one other criterion:
 
Assessment Data
 
____ Qualifying score on Measures of Academic Progress (MAP) Gifted and Talented Placement Guidelines
        (reading or math)
 
____ WKCE-CRT (Scale Scores) at 98th percentile (reading, math, social studies, or science)
 
____ Mathematics (Grades K-1): Broad Math Composite on the Woodcock-Johnson of 135 through 140
 
____ Reading (Grades K-1): Instructional level at least three grade levels above the current grade level on the
        District Level II Reading Assessment or on the QRI (both narrative and expository)
 
____ Nationally normed standardized test scores at 98th national percentile
 
Supporting Data
 
____ 27-30 on the Specific Academic section of the Parent/Guardian Inventory Checklist
 
____ A score of 113-124 on the academic subscale of the Gifted and Talented Evaluation Scales (GATES)
_____________________________
 
Level I
Acceptable InView Total Verbal/Nonverbal score (see previous page), one criterion from assessment data, and a minimum of one other criterion:
 
Assessment Data
 
____ Qualifying score on Measures of Academic Progress (MAP) Gifted and Talented Placement Guidelines
        (reading or math)
 
____ WKCE-CRT (Scale Scores) at 97th percentile (reading, math, social studies, or science)
 
____ Mathematics (Grades K-1): Broad Math Composite on the WoodcockJohnson of 130 through 134
 
____ Reading (Grades K-1): Instructional level at least two grade levels above the current grade level on the District
        Level II Reading Assessment or on the QRI (both narrative and expository)
 
____ Nationally normed standardized test scores at 97th national percentile
 
Supporting Data
 
____ 24-26 on the Specific Academic section of the Parent/Guardian Inventory Checklist
 
____ A score of 108-112 on the academic subscale of the Gifted and Talented Evaluation Scales (GATES)
 
Creativity - *DRAFT
 
* Pilot Study 2009-2010
 
Level III
Acceptable assessment data score and one of the supporting data criteria:
 
Assessment Data
 
____ A score of 99 on either the figural or verbal sections of the Torrance Tests of Creative Thinking
 
Supporting Data
 
____ 38-40 on the Creativity section of the Parent/Guardian Inventory Checklist
 
____ A score of 125-130 on creative portion of the Gifted and Talented Evaluation Scales (GATES)
_____________________________
 
Level II
Acceptable assessment data score and one of the supporting data criteria:
 
Assessment Data
 
____ A score of 97 or 98 on either the figural or verbal sections of the Torrance Tests of Creative Thinking
 
Supporting Data
 
____ 34-37 on the Creativity section of the Parent/Guardian Inventory Checklist
 
____ A score of 113-124 on creative portion of the Gifted and alented Evaluation Scales (GATES)
 
_____________________________
 
Level I
Acceptable assessment data score and one of the supporting data criteria:
 
Assessment Data
 
____ A score of 95 or 96 on either the figural or verbal sections of the Torrance Tests of Creative Thinking
 
Supporting Data
 
____ 30-33 on the Creativity section of the Parent/Guardian Inventory Checklist
 
____ A score of 108-112 on creative portion of the Gifted and Talented Evaluation Scales (GATES)
 
Artistic (Visual/Performing Arts) - *DRAFT
 
* Pilot Study 2009-2010
 
Level III
Performance data meets Level III criteria on rubric and one of the supporting data criteria:
 
Performance Data
 
____ For ART – portfolio of work (may include digital photographs) collected within one year of the student’s
        current grade level to be reviewed by an art teacher and content team leader
 
____ For MUSIC – audio tape of the student’s performance taped within one year of the student’s current grade
        level to be reviewed by a music teacher and a content team leader (copies of the music submitted with the
        tape)
 
____ For DRAMA – visual or audio tape of the student’s performance taped within one year of the student’s current
        grade level to be reviewed by two or more educators
 
Supporting Data
 
____ 19-20 on the Artistic section of the Parent/Guardian Inventory Checklist
 
____ A score of 125-130 on the artistic talents subscale of the Gifted and Talented Evaluation Scales (GATES) 
_____________________________
 
Level II
Performance data meets Level II criteria on rubric and one of the supporting data criteria:
 
Performance Data
 
____ For ART – portfolio of work (may include digital photographs) collected within one year of the student’s
        current grade level to be reviewed by an art teacher and content team leader
 
____ For MUSIC – audio tape of the student’s performance taped within one year of the student’s current grade
        level to be reviewed by a music teacher and a content team leader (copies of the music submitted with the
        tape)
 
____ For DRAMA – visual or audio tape of the student’s performance taped within one year of the student’s current
        grade level to be reviewed by two or more educators
 
Supporting Data
 
____ 17-18 on the Artistic section of the Parent/Guardian Inventory Checklist
 
____ A score of 113-124 on the artistic talents subscale of the Gifted and Talented Evaluation Scales (GATES) 
_____________________________
 
Level I
Performance data meets Level I criteria on rubric and one of the supporting data criteria:
 
Performance Data
 
____ For ART – portfolio of work (may include digital photographs) collected within one year of the student’s
        current grade level to be reviewed by an art teacher and content team leader
 
____ For MUSIC – audio tape of the student’s performance taped within one year of the student’s current grade
        level to be reviewed by a music teacher and a content team leader (copies of the music submitted with the
        tape)
 
____ For DRAMA – visual or audio tape of the student’s performance taped within one year of the student’s current
        grade level to be reviewed by two or more educators
 
Supporting Data
 
____ 15-16 on the Artistic section of the Parent/Guardian Inventory Checklist
 
____ A score of 108-112 on the artistic talents subscale of the Gifted and Talented Evaluation Scales (GATES)
 
Leadership - *DRAFT
 
* Pilot Study 2009-2010
 
Level III
Performance data meets Level III criteria on rubric and one of the supporting data criteria:
 
Performance Data
 
____ Student generated evidence of leadership activity to be reviewed by two or more educators
 
Supporting Data
 
____ 38-40 on the Leadership section of the Parent/Guardian Inventory Checklist
 
____ A score of 125-130 on leadership portion of the Gifted and Talented Evaluation Scales (GATES) 
_____________________________
 
Level II
Performance data meets Level II criteria on rubric and one of the supporting data criteria:
 
Performance Data
 
____ Student generated evidence of leadership activity to be reviewed by two or more educators
 
Supporting Data
 
____ 34-37 on the Leadership section of the Parent/Guardian Inventory Checklist
 
____ A score of 113-124 on leadership portion of the Gifted and Talented Evaluation Scales (GATES)  
_____________________________
 
Level I
Performance data meets Level I criteria on rubric and one of the supporting data criteria:
 
Performance Data
 
____ Student generated evidence of leadership activity to be reviewed by two or more educators
 
Supporting Data
 
____ 30-33 on the Leadership section of the Parent/Guardian Inventory Checklist
 
____ A score of 108-112 on leadership portion of the Gifted and Talented Evaluation Scales (GATES)
 
GIFTED AND TALENTED SERVICES
 
Ideally, student’s academic needs are met in the place where they spend most of their time. For most students,
this is in the classroom with their classroom, subject area, music, art, band, orchestra or drama teachers.
Teachers differentiate instruction by providing students with a variety of opportunities and options for success.
Differentiated instruction is not a curriculum or a program. It is a process that enables teachers to improve student
learning by matching students’ learning characteristics to district standards and benchmarks. This process
requires teachers to anticipate and acknowledge the differences in students’ readiness, interests, and learning
style. Teachers can then effectively engage students in meaningful and challenging work.
 
A Differentiated Education Plan (elementary) or a Gifted and Talented Middle School Programming Model
Checklist is created and implemented for identified students. The plan is jointly developed by classroom teachers
and District Teacher Leaders and reviewed on a yearly basis. The review includes recent assessment data, current
performance data, and recent observational data.
 
Through 8th grade, exceptional needs are largely met through a variety of classroom differentiation opportunities. In
high school, exceptional needs are met through differentiation as well as student placement and scheduling.
Students should work with their school counselor to ensure a sequence of courses (including AP courses and
independent studies) that are most aligned to the student’s interests and needs.
 
Even with effective differentiation, some students require additional opportunity and greater challenge. For these
students, the District Teacher Leader, School Counselor, Content Area Leaders and/or principal will assist
classroom teachers in identifying resources and programming options to meet students’ demonstrated needs.
 
Identification Matched With Programming
 
Classroom Differentiation — Level I
The majority of students needing gifted and talented services will have their learning needs met through services in
the regular classroom by the classroom teacher. The base of the Gifted and Talented Programming Model
represents these students. Differentiation includes instructional strategies that an educator uses to meet student
learning needs. These strategies include but are not limited to the use of flexible grouping, tiered assignments, pre-
assessment, modified assignments, independent projects, extensions, and enrichment.
 
Targeted Instruction — Level II
Level II represents a smaller number of students whose needs become more unique and services become more
specialized. In addition to Level I services, the classroom teacher collaborates with the District Teacher Leader,
specialists, and grade level colleagues to plan learning activities to meet the student’s demonstrated need.
Academic venues/competitions, special programming, guidance, subject level acceleration, grade level
acceleration, or independent projects may be used to meet student learning needs.
 
Individualized Services — Level III
The top of the pyramid represents a very small number of students. These services are for students whose needs
for academic and intellectual challenge transcend the grade level curriculum by so much that it is unlikely that
even with effective differentiation at that grade level they will be adequately challenged. Instructional strategies and
services for students with highly exceptional needs include all services at Levels I and Level II plus the possibility of
grade level acceleration, radical acceleration, distance learning options, or post secondary options. Grade
acceleration is a significant decision that requires the collaborative efforts of teachers, the District Teacher Leader,
the school counselor, administration, the school psychologist and parents.
 
Characteristics of Gifted Learners by Area of Identification
 
Researchers in the field of gifted education generally agree that gifted children display some common charac-teristics. The list below comes from the Gifted and Talented Resource Guide for Educators, Coordinators, and
Administrators in WI Public Schools. Intensity is a key factor when recognizing how these characteristics impact
student learning.
 
General Intellectual Ability
 
• understands complex concepts
 
• draws inferences between content areas
 
• sees beyond the obvious
 
• thrives on new or complex ideas
 
• enjoys hypothesizing
 
• intuitively knows before taught
 
• uses an extensive vocabulary
 
• does in-depth investigations
 
• learns rapidly in comparison to peers
 
• 1 - 2 repetitions for mastery
 
• manipulates information
 
Specific Academic Ability
 
• strong memorization ability
 
• advanced comprehension
 
• 1-2 repetitions for mastery
 
• intense interest in a specific academic area
 
• high academic capacity in special interest area
 
• pursues special interests with enthusiasm
 
• operates at a higher level of abstraction than peers
 
• asks poignant questions
 
• discusses and elaborates in detail
 
Creativity
 
• independent and/or flexible thinker
 
• intrigued by creative tasks
 
• improvises and sees unique possibilities
 
• exhibits original thinking in oral and/or written expression
 
• generates many ideas to solve a given problem
 
• possesses a keen sense of humor
 
• risk taker
 
• resists conformity
 
• creates and invents
 
Artistic (Visual/Performing Arts)
 
• communicates their vision in visual/performing arts
 
• unusual ability for aesthetic expression
 
• compelled to perform/produce
 
• excels in demonstrating the visual/performing arts
 
• exhibits creative expression
 
• desire for creating original product
 
• keenly observant
 
• continues experimentation with preferred medium
 
Leadership
 
• takes an active role in decision-making
 
• high expectations for self and others
 
• expresses self with confidence
 
• sought out by others to accomplish a task
 
• follows through on a plan
 
• foresees consequences and implications of decisions
 
• appears to be well liked by peers
 
• ideas expressed accepted by others
 
Descriptions of Gifted & Talented Identification Areas
 
Giftedness is multidimensional. Students may be capable of superior performance or potential in one or more of
the following areas:
 
General Intellectual Ability (GIA)
Demonstrated excellence in most academic areas
 
Intellectually gifted children exhibit early and rapid development of language ability, strong powers of reasoning and
advanced ability in critical thinking and problem solving in multiple areas. They may manipulate information in
divergent ways when challenged by complex issues. Typically these children are noted for being several years
beyond their peers in their cognitive ability.
 
Specific Academic Area (SAA)
Exceptional ability and performance in a single academic area
 
Academically able students have unusual/advanced ability or capability in reading, math, science, and/or social
studies. These students often make connections within a discipline that transcends the obvious. They quickly
grasp relationships among facts, and see facts as parts of a more complex whole.
 
Creativity
Exceptional ability to use divergent and unconventional thinking in arriving at creative and unusual ideas or solutions to problems
 
Creativity may cross all areas (academic, arts, leadership). Highly creative students tend to develop original ideas
and products. They may express their creativity in oral, written, or nonverbal expression. They are flexible and
original in their thinking, tending to reject one-answer solutions. These children tend to possess strong
visualization. Frequently these individuals are strongly independent and often resist conformity. Creativity is
characterized by originality of thought, human behavior, and product.
 
Artistic (Visual/Performing Arts)
Ability to create or perform in music or drama in a way that suggests exceptional talent or an ability to paint, sculpt, photograph or arrange media in a way that suggests exceptional talent
 
Students can demonstrate unusual adeptness or skill in the field of drama, music, and visual arts. Since this is a
performance-based talent, identification should center around nominations, portfolios and expert assessment.
 
Leadership
Exceptional ability to relate to and motivate others
 
Leadership comes in many forms and may be positive or negative. Individuals gifted in leadership usually have the
ability to convince people to act or not act in specific ways. Leaders are often self-confident and comfortable with
their peers. They express themselves well and frequently are charming and charismatic. It is important to
recognize that leadership traits may manifest into different leadership styles, depending upon environment and
personality of the individual. Observable characteristics may include influencing peers, being sought out by others
to accomplish a task, addressing a need, holding high expectations for self and others, demonstrating or
delegating responsibility, and internalizing concepts of right and wrong.
 
MAP Gifted and Talented Placement Guidelines
 
Because NWEA tests provide information about an individual student’s instructional level, test scores can help
guide placement in appropriate instructional programs.
 
GT LEVELS I, II, and III
 
Grade Level  2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
 
Fall Mathematics Screening
(RIT values)
 
Grade Level Median               179      193      203      211      218      225      230      234      238
 
Gifted (Localized) Level 1-2     210-     222-     233-     240-     248-     253-     257-     261- 
                                            221      232      239      247      252      256      260
 
Gifted (Localized) Level 3        222-     233-     240-     248-     253-     257-     261-
                                            232      239      247      252      256      260
 
Fall Reading Screening
(RIT values)
 
Grade Level Median               178      192      201      208      213      217      220      223      226
 
Gifted (Localized) Level 1-2     212-     219-     226-     232-     235-     238-     241-     243-
                                            218      225      231      234      237      240      242
 
Gifted (Localized) Level 3        219-     226-     232-     235-     238-     241-     243-
                                            225      231      234      237      240      242
 
Winter Mathematics Screening
(RIT values)
 
Grade Level Median               191       202     211       219     224      229      234      239     240
 
Gifted (Localized) Level 1-2     221-     232-     241-     249-     255-     260-     263-     265-
                                            231      240      248      254      259      262      264
 
Gifted (Localized) Level 3        232-     241-     249-     255-     260-     263-     265-
                                            240      248      254      259      262      264
 
Winter Reading Screening
(RIT values)
 
Grade Level Median               190     200      207      212      217      220      223      225      227
 
Gifted (Localized) Level1-2     218-     225-     230-     236-     239-     242-     244      245-
                                           224      229      235      238      241      243   
 
Gifted (Localized) Level 3      225-      230-     236-     239-     242     243      244       245-  
                                          229       235      238      241
 
 
 Revised 1/10
Approved/Adopted:  July 13, 2009
ĉ
Shari Weinstock,
Jul 28, 2011, 1:50 PM